Modeling Fermentation in Beer Brewing Yields a Better Product

Bridget Cunningham | April 25, 2016

Behind every glass of beer is a series of steps that deliver its unique taste. Fermentation, the process during which sugars are converted into alcohol, is one of these important steps. With the help of COMSOL Multiphysics, we can study the fermentation process, identifying ways to optimize its efficiency and serve up a better-tasting beer.


Edmund Dickinson | January 19, 2016

When studying a system’s chemical kinetics, it’s common to use perfectly mixed batch reactor assumptions and design experiments that keep mixing conditions ideal. Such assumptions include perfectly mixed (ideal tank reactors) and perfectly unmixed (ideal plug flow reactors). In reality, however, it’s rare that all of the reactor’s parts behave the same way. Space-dependent modeling is thus essential in understanding and optimizing chemical reactors. Let’s explore the development of a detailed reactor model, starting with a simple perfectly mixed example.


Ed Fontes | May 12, 2015

Biosensors are the workhorses of the analytical tools used for detailed mechanistic understanding at the molecular level of biological systems. The applications of these analysis tools are countless for the detection of biomolecules in the pharmaceutical, health care, and food industries; agriculture; environmental technologies; and in general for research of biological systems. The biosensor demo app is a good example of an application where non-experts can benefit from accurate multiphysics simulations.


Bridget Cunningham | March 13, 2015

The biological and chemical processes behind the development of biopharmaceuticals have an important effect on product quality. With its ability to deliver quick results at a lower cost, simulation is a valuable resource in studying and optimizing these techniques. Learn how COMSOL Multiphysics can benefit your modeling of biopharmaceutical processes.


Niklas Rom | February 13, 2015

Many exciting features for chemical engineering modeling were introduced in COMSOL Multiphysics version 5.0. In this blog post, I will discuss the most important updates. There are some new modeling interfaces, such as the Chemistry interface, and some that have been revamped and improved, like the Reaction Engineering interface. To begin with, I will recap the modeling interfaces for reaction engineering and mass transport.


Ed Fontes | November 21, 2014

The Tubular Reactor application is a tool where students can model a nonideal tubular reactor, including radial and axial variations in temperature and composition, and investigate the impact of different operating conditions. It also exemplifies how teachers can build tailored interfaces for problems that challenge the students’ imagination. The model and exercise are originally described in Scott Fogler’s book Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering. I wish I had access to this type of tool when I was a student!


Lexi Carver | December 28, 2015

Corrosion is one of the most serious factors affecting the transportation industry. In an effort to minimize its impact, a German research institute and the manufacturers of Mercedes-Benz joined forces to investigate the corrosion occurring in automotive rivets and sheet metal. Using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation, they were able to study corrosion’s effects on car components.


Bridget Cunningham | April 2, 2015

In this blog post, we investigate syngas combustion in a round-jet burner using the Reacting Flow interface and the Heat Transfer in Solids interface. The results from this benchmark model are compared to experimental findings.


Bridget Cunningham | February 24, 2015

Continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), or ideal stirred tank reactors, are frequently used in the chemical and biochemical industries. This reactor type operates at steady state and because of its good mixing properties, it is assumed that the composition throughout the reactor is uniform. Using a new model in the Reaction Engineering interface, we can visualize the dynamics within an ideal system of tank reactors.


Ed Fontes | February 3, 2015

Modeling of heterogeneous catalysis traditionally attracts great interest from the chemical engineering community, due to the many industrial processes that utilize this type of catalysis. Here, we discuss the procedure of starting with detailed micro-geometries and then proceeding with approximations through homogenization. By following this procedure, from the microscopic particle level to the macroscopic reactor level, we can design the catalyst in detail and study the influence of this design on the total reactor performance.


Niklas Rom | November 3, 2014

Probably the most common reactor in the chemical industry is the packed bed reactor. This reactor is used in chemical synthesis and for effluent treatment and catalytic combustion. Oftentimes, heterogeneous catalysis requires packed beds. A common design is a cylindrical column filled with catalyst pellets. The pellets can be contained within supporting structures, like tubes or channels, or packed in a single compartment in the column. The latter is called dumped packing.


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