Alexandra Foley | September 3, 2013

It’s probably something we have all experienced. We get home, stick last night’s leftovers in the microwave, and sit down to have a nice meal — only to realize that the food is scalding hot one bite and freezing cold the next. This experience has prompted me on more than one occasion to wonder: Why does a microwave heat food so unevenly?

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David Kan | August 28, 2013

Fractals are those exotic mathematical entities whose geometric properties fall between integer dimensions (1D, 2D, 3D). Space-filling curves and bounded sets with infinite perimeters fall into this category.

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Fanny Littmarck | August 12, 2013

It seems everyone and their kid brother has a cell phone these days — and we are constantly using them. We don’t just rely on them to make calls anymore, either; they serve as our maps, calendars, to-do lists, channel for social interaction, and so forth. This continuous use begs the question: “What about the radiation our phones emit, and how much of it is absorbed by our brains?” When considering this, scientists use the specific absorption rate (SAR) to […]

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Walter Frei | June 20, 2013

The Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) is commonly used in microwave circuits. COMSOL Multiphysics, with the RF Module, makes it easy to compute the impedance, fields, losses, and other operating parameters needed when designing a CPW.

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Bjorn Sjodin | April 23, 2013

Optical fibers are used to transmit information in the form of light through an optical waveguide made of glass fibers. The light is sent in a series of pulses that can be translated as binary code, allowing the transfer of information through the fiber. Because such pulses can travel with less attenuation and are immune to electromagnetic disturbances, fibers are used instead of traditional metallic wires thus allowing data transmission over longer distances and at higher bandwidths.

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Fanny Littmarck | November 15, 2012

Last month was Breast Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM). In many parts of the world walks were coordinated to fundraise for breast cancer research, and here in the U.S. it also meant NFL football players donned pink gear throughout the month. It was only fitting then, that a poster was presented on the topic at our conference in Boston. The research presented there explores a new method for detecting breast tumors.

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Fanny Littmarck | October 24, 2012

It’s no secret that there’s a lot of guesswork involved in oil production. Oil companies make “Big Money” decisions based on estimates – estimates with huge margins of error. What’s more, there is an incredible amount of risk involved, but with the potential for a large pay-off if all goes according to plan. The plan is based on “best guesses” and less than perfect data. Still, there are many big players in the oil industry that are doing very well […]

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Fanny Littmarck | October 16, 2012

These days, RFID tags are used in many applications. Ranging from packing slips to ID badges, RFID tags are embedded into many different objects by businesses everywhere. Once tagged, these can be tracked to improve functions such as inventory management, security, manufacturing processes, and more. You can also implant an RFID tag into animals, such as cattle or pets, so that they can be found in case of theft or loss, for instance. Wild animals that are found far from […]

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Phil Kinnane | March 28, 2012

After I wrote about a group from EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland in a previous blog post, “Modeling Lightning Strikes is a Multiphysics Problem”, I checked to see if anyone from this group has presented at our conferences. It was great to find that Dr. Abdolhamid Shoory in fact has done so, with a paper titled: “Using COMSOL to Solve for Currents along a Thin-Wire Antenna Excited by a Lumped Source”.

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Phil Kinnane | March 9, 2012

I’ve been blogging quite a bit about RF models the last few weeks. This is because, lately, we have been producing quite a number of them. A press release that was published yesterday summarizes this work: “Tutorial Package Has 20 New Models for Antenna Design, Plasmonics, and Benchmarking Electromagnetics Simulations”.

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Phil Kinnane | March 5, 2012

Someone who saw my RFID model blog post from a few days back pointed me towards a site that talks just about RFIDs. On it, I discovered a lot of articles about using RFID in the biomedical industry. This was an application that I had never thought of before. I’d always associated RFIDs with security, tracking packages and the like.

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